Delirious Thrall

miacasti:

Amazing.

miacasti:

Amazing.

(Source: katherineanneodette)

This is the movie Beowulf's interpretation of Grendel and this year while reading the poem again I only pictures him

Beowulf’s Sacrifice and Transcendence

Rumination 3:

In my first couple readings the defeat of Grendel, his mother, and the showering of gifts always seemed like a solid ending to me and I always felt the dragon and the death of Beowulf was an unnecessary until recently when I realized what the identity of the dragon is and what it embodies.  One can easily see that the dragon embodies moral evil and in turn sin and Beowulf symbolizes a second chance for humanity.

In the final act the dragon is spurred from a “sin warrior” and breathes fire much like one would envision hell and Satan.  The dragon steals a hoard of treasure and sits on it for 300 years unchallenged.  I think that this stands for the sins envy, lust, and gluttony.  I would even go so far as to say that the time span of 300 years symbolizes sloth.  A thief steals a jeweled cup and hurts the dragons pride which turns into his wrath.  It is here that we see the dragon in full rage spitting out deadly fire (sin) on humanity.

Beowulf knows that he is the only one that can stop it because he is the only one that hasn’t been corrupted by sin.  Beowulf was taken under the honorable King Hygelac at the young age of 7.  He then goes on to discuss the tragic death of Hygelac’s son symbolizing that Beowulf is the last of the “incorruptible”.  He discusses how he will not stand by and watch humanity fail “translation may be indicated as follows: (Just) as it is sad for an old man to see his son ride young on the gallows when he himself is uttering mournful measures, a sorrowful song, while his son hangs for a comfort to the raven, and he, old and infirm, cannot render him any”.  It is here that he decides to defeat the dragon with iron shield instead of wood symbolizing he must rely on his own strength instead of humanity’s.  From here Beowulf fights the dragon and his sword fails him just as his comrades did except for Wiglaf who, as the text states, rides along with Beowulf for the first time.  Their combined effort kills the dragon and Beowulf gets to look upon the hoard (humanities golden future) one last time.

N/A (2005-07-19). Beowulf: An Anglo-Saxon Epic Poem (Kindle Locations 1311-1313). Public Domain Books. Kindle Edition. 

Captain Kirk at his best

http://bardfilm.blogspot.com/2009/05/star-trek-sonnet-57.html

Here is a performance of Captain Kirk performing Shakespeare’s Sonnets and there is an especially bad one with Spock

An afterthought in the beginning

Rumination #2 Delirious Thrall: My understanding of the sonnets comes only through reading it as a story, that is completely out of order. The Shakespeare Sonnets encompasses the idea of a poet choosing to seek purpose through immortality after being scorned and deceived by a woman (127-152). In the beginning of these sonnets she is described as a black beauty, which he states “In the old age black was not counted fair”. I think this means that her beauty was in the form of him learning a harsh lesson and learning his true purpose. It is in sonnet 146 that he realizes moral pleasures are insignificant to the ultimate doom of nothingness. The final lines of this sonnet summarize how death is the ultimate end to morale pleasures “So shalt though feed on death, that feeds on men, And death once dead, there’s no more dying then.” It is here that he chooses the rival suitor, who he thinks his dark lady left him for, as his writing subject. He decides it is through his pen that he will find his purpose and inherently conquer time. His subject becomes his focal point of obsession eventually realizing that the rival is much more noble than he originally perceived. I think that the venereal disease referenced in sonnet 144 (“Till my bad angel fire my good one out”) never actually appears referring to him having a change of heart. It is then that the poet understands that this man is true beauty and he becomes infatuated with the idea of being him, in turn loving him. His obsession leads him to achieve his goal of becoming immortal by writing from his heart. It is upon this realization that he becomes sympathetic towards his subject for immortality is truly for the poet alone. The sonnets 55-65 describe what his accomplishment would mean through metaphors that are both earthly and heavenly. Sonnets 71-74 takes one back to reality in which the poet is portrayed on his deathbed, content except for the fact that he can’t share his immortality. The poet’s final wishes are for his love to find happiness and procreate so his beauty can continue on in the mortal world.

An afterthought in the beginning

Rumination #2 Delirious Thrall: My understanding of the sonnets comes only through reading it as a story, that is completely out of order. The Shakespeare Sonnets encompasses the idea of a poet choosing to seek purpose through immortality after being scorned and deceived by a woman (127-152). In the beginning of these sonnets she is described as a black beauty, which he states “In the old age black was not counted fair”. I think this means that her beauty was in the form of him learning a harsh lesson and learning his true purpose. It is in sonnet 146 that he realizes moral pleasures are insignificant to the ultimate doom of nothingness. The final lines of this sonnet summarize how death is the ultimate end to morale pleasures “So shalt though feed on death, that feeds on men, And death once dead, there’s no more dying then.” It is here that he chooses the rival suitor, who he thinks his dark lady left him for, as his writing subject. He decides it is through his pen that he will find his purpose and inherently conquer time. His subject becomes his focal point of obsession eventually realizing that the rival is much more noble than he originally perceived. I think that the venereal disease referenced in sonnet 144 (“Till my bad angel fire my good one out”) never actually appears referring to him having a change of heart. It is then that the poet understands that this man is true beauty and he becomes infatuated with the idea of being him, in turn loving him. His obsession leads him to achieve his goal of becoming immortal by writing from his heart. It is upon this realization that he becomes sympathetic towards his subject for immortality is truly for the poet alone. The sonnets 55-65 describe what his accomplishment would mean through metaphors that are both earthly and heavenly. Sonnets 71-74 takes one back to reality in which the poet is portrayed on his deathbed, content except for the fact that he can’t share his immortality. The poet’s final wishes are for his love to find happiness and procreate so his beauty can continue on in the mortal world.

An afterthought in the beginning

Rumination #2 Delirious Thrall: My understanding of the sonnets comes only through reading it as a story, that is completely out of order. The Shakespeare Sonnets encompasses the idea of a poet choosing to seek purpose through immortality after being scorned and deceived by a woman (127-152). In the beginning of these sonnets she is described as a black beauty, which he states “In the old age black was not counted fair”. I think this means that her beauty was in the form of him learning a harsh lesson and learning his true purpose. It is in sonnet 146 that he realizes moral pleasures are insignificant to the ultimate doom of nothingness. The final lines of this sonnet summarize how death is the ultimate end to morale pleasures “So shalt though feed on death, that feeds on men, And death once dead, there’s no more dying then.” It is here that he chooses the rival suitor, who he thinks his dark lady left him for, as his writing subject. He decides it is through his pen that he will find his purpose and inherently conquer time. His subject becomes his focal point of obsession eventually realizing that the rival is much more noble than he originally perceived. I think that the venereal disease referenced in sonnet 144 (“Till my bad angel fire my good one out”) never actually appears referring to him having a change of heart. It is then that the poet understands that this man is true beauty and he becomes infatuated with the idea of being him, in turn loving him. His obsession leads him to achieve his goal of becoming immortal by writing from his heart. It is upon this realization that he becomes sympathetic towards his subject for immortality is truly for the poet alone. The sonnets 55-65 describe what his accomplishment would mean through metaphors that are both earthly and heavenly. Sonnets 71-74 takes one back to reality in which the poet is portrayed on his deathbed, content except for the fact that he can’t share his immortality. The poet’s final wishes are for his love to find happiness and procreate so his beauty can continue on in the mortal world.

not sure if rumination is in right place

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Constantly getting this message when I try to post my rumination if anyone sees it can they just like it so I know its in the right place/ confidence booster?

Milton’s Ode to Cromwell

One interesting thing that I noticed in Milton’s sonnets is his reference to Cromwell.  To give some historical context Milton worked under Cromwell after the civil war and beheading of King Charles I until Cromwell’s death.  After Cromwell died his son passed on becoming leader of England and the royal family resumed the crown.  There would be implications for Milton because the beheading of the King was seen as sacrilegious and many were punished.  Milton would be spared but this infuriated him leading him to write Paradise Lost 

This is one of a couple of songs off the album Juturna that are directly related to the movie Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind.  Both the movie and the album discuss trying to move on from a breakup by erasing the memories of the significant other.   In the end a song titled “Meet me in Montauk” signifies that one can’t try to “forget” a relationship and always looks for a second chance. This reminds me of Delia in which the writer is plagued by the memory of his lost love. He says that he ponders her throughout the day and is still plagued by her in his dreams. The only way he can cope is knowing that he is going to immortalize their relationship through poetry. Both stories say to me that one must adequately cope when a relationship has ended instead of just regretting it.